© 2019 Coed Cae

Tel: 01341 430628

CONTACT US

Coed Cae, Taicynhaeaf, Dolgellau, Gwynedd, LL40 2TU

Mobile: 07909 996983

Outdoor Activities

Cycling

There is lots of great cycling on easy trails and quiet back roads around the Mawddach Estuary, including the popular Mawddach trail. We have a number of bikes, a tag along, a toddlers trailer and even a tandem for guests to rent to explore the estuary.

The Mawddach trail, made popular by Julia Bradbury's "Railway Walks" which featured our very own Jacky, is a well surfaced track built on an old railway bed. The trail runs from Dolgellau to Barmouth along the southern margins of the estuary and is a great route for cycles, trailers, wheelchairs and feet. Coed Cae guests are able to  access the trail by crossing the historic toll-bridge at Penmaenpool. 
Trail Running 

The Coed y Brenin forest has established itself as a popular trail-running centre, and is home to  a range of way-marked  routes to suit all abilities, along with a dedicated running shop. The centre organises a year round programme of  runs, training courses and events including a brutal trail marathon. 

Geocaching

Set somewhere between orienteering and a treasure hunt, geocaching is an entertaining adventure game for GPS users. Participating in a cache hunt is a good way to explore an area, and to take advantage of the wonderful features and capability of a GPS unit. Caches have been set up all over the world by individuals and organizations and in their simplest form contain just a logbook of visitors. The locations are posted on the Internet and GPS users can then use the given coordinates to find the caches. Further information and a list of caches in the area around Coed Cae can be found at www.geocaching.com by typing in our postcode (LL40 2TU).

Bird Watching

The RSPB has two reserves on the Mawddach Estuary. The Coed Garth Gell reserve lies immediately west of Coed Cae on the opposite side of the valley, and is in easy walking distance. There is an attractive 3½ mile circular walk through oak wood and scrub land, making use of some of the tramways left over from long gone gold-mine workings. 

A second reserve, Arthog Bog wetlands is situated near the southern end of the Barmouth Bridge and has disabled access.

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